HOWTO write a Perl Obfu

September 5, 2011

Here’s one I found once a long time ago and keep thinking of randomly. jynx on Perlmonks explains what makes and breaks an Obfuscated Code entry. Does anyone still write Perl? Does anyone still write (intentionally) obfuscated Perl? Still, I really like the way he offers examples and counter-examples of each principle.

2) pack/unpack is not obfuscation

The reason i list the counter-example is because it is not unpacking anything like what you think at first glance. While the obfu itself does need some work, that is an acceptable use of unpack. On the other hand, looking at the example we see a fairly common use of unpack: get the string and unpack it, oh look the string is japh. While a packed string is line noise, it’s easy to see past it and note what the code is doing if it’s a simple obfu.

Comments Off

Fanboy Supercuts, Obsessive Video Montages

January 7, 2010

Seen via JWZ, this list of supercuts.

My favorites are the Red Dwarf, every "smeg" reference and Every Famicon (NES) Game Title Screen. It’s completely fascinating how much you can glean from just this kind of cross-section: for example, Lister says "smeg" more than any other character; Holly says it only once, and Cat only a few times; the most common "smeg-" compounds are "smeg-head" and "smeg-for-brains"; "smeg" is said in despair/panic as well as ecstatic joy ("fan-smegging-tastic!").

Comments Off

Wintour Guide

October 20, 2009

From Sumana, an article about The September Issue.

Coddington calls herself a romantic. She loves old gardens and 1920s styles. And she remembers what got shot for a previous issue but didn’t run, and notices when Wintour cuts a few spreads from the coming issue that represent USD$50,000 worth of work. She must know that she works for an enormous, ridiculous edifice. She must know that it’s unsustainable, that her art form requires resources that only monarchies and this historically anomalous corporate media system can bring to bear. Anna and Coddington and Condé Nast are in a symbiosis to perpetuate a grand, dying art.

"High fashion" is a niche, like opera, regimented gardens, country dancing, &c., and getting niche-ier. Wintour says fashion is about what’s next; does she know? The September Issue doesn’t say.

It’s been said that fashion is about the future of what people are going to wear, even if it’s only ideas that get taken up into the mainstream; is that so? It sure does seem like a strange place to hang out if you can tell what’s next.

Comments Off

Polaroid Lovers Try to Revive Its Instant Film

May 26, 2009

A fascinating volley in the “old arts die out” discussion.

Maximum Prophet nods a NY Times piece on a Dutch group living the retro dream: they are trying to bring back Polaroid film. This group has the machinery to make the film packs, but needs to recreate the chemicals. Polaroid Inc. stopping making the specialized chemicals years ago, after having stockpiled what they would need for their last production runs. “They want to recast an outdated production process in an abandoned Polaroid factory for an age that has fallen for digital pictures because they think people still have room in their hearts for retro photography that eschews airbrushing or Photoshop. ‘This project is about building a very interesting business to last for at least another decade,’ said Florian Kaps, the Austrian entrepreneur behind the effort [in Enschede, The Netherlands]. ‘It is about the importance of analog aspects in a more and more digital world. … If everyone runs in one direction [i.e. digital photography], it creates a niche market in the other.’”

Comments Off